Another new blog on the internet – aren’t there already enough of those? Some would say no. I, for one, am a fan of the open, interoperable, indie web, even if that seems to stack the cards against you.1

I’ll keep this introductory post brief. We2 want to start a SaaS product, and while there seem to be awfully many “founder stories” around of people magically getting 50k downloads, $10k MRR, etc., we don’t often hear about the long, rocky path to sustainable success. There’s often scant detail about the initial steps: ideation, validation, etc. Also, all these whiz-bang success stories suffer from enormous survivorship bias. Not to mention they leave us normal folks feeling quite inadequate, when in reality there’s enormous luck involved, too.3

Unfortunately, “failure” isn’t sexy. As a result there seem to be few resources online talking about the things people have tried that haven’t worked. We want to take a more optimistic view. From each “failure” we hope to learn things, get better at what we’re trying to do, so that 10 years from now, looking back, we can point at all the hustle that goes into trying to Build Something.

We figured we might as well challenge ourselves to get something out there, right now, instead of waiting until perhaps one day if and/or when we manage to create something successful. This way, at the very least we’re keeping ourselves accountable by publicly writing about what we’re trying, and who knows, we might be able to say something that someone somewhere finds useful. We’re also very keen for feedback, so any and all input is more than welcome. Ideas, critique, links to resources, we want it, our inboxes are open. Have a look at the Contact us page if you want to get in touch, or try our low-budget comments box down below!

We’re just trying to muddle along making our own way here, so we’re bound to have many a false start, but we are trying something new to us – join us for the ride, and we’ll see what happens!



  1. It seems like the easiest way to spread the word about your fancy new product in this day and age can be via social media. I hope it’s not true that without a Twitter/Facebook/Instagram/etc. page you basically don’t exist, because I happen to think those companies are despicable. Probably worth writing an entire book on that subject alone. Anyway, that’s what I mean when I say that might be a disadvantage. 

  2. There’s more about who we are in this post

  3. Not to discount the role of hard work – apparently it was Louis Pasteur who said that “fortune favours the prepared mind”. Of course hard work is part of the baseline requirements, but becoming a millionaire overnight isn’t purely the result of hard work. It seems to me that many incredibly successful founders are prone to minimising the role of luck and privilege, and instead focus on their supposed superhuman capabilities.